This is a Video post
Countries:
Iraq
Candidates:
none
Issues:
International Relations, War & Conflict
 

Americans will soon be going to the polls to make a decision on behalf of the entire world. At least this is what international folks say. To shed light on what ‘foreigners' think and feel, Link TV has launched Dear American Voter, a pioneering project in which people from outside the US send video messages to Americans. Here is a cross-section of reactions, focusing on international affairs.

From Kazakhstan, Zhuldyz Jumadilova wants Americans to think more about international issues, like the war on Iraq and the war on terror. She explains:

I think American people are concentrating on their local problems, local issues, and sometimes maybe they don't think more about international problems. I think if the American people think about international problems in the elections of 2004, George W Bush would not be (in that) presidential election.

From Italy, this man shares similar sentiments. He says:

One thing I'd like you to think about while casting your vote is to bear in mind that the person you're going to vote for is going to represent the most power country all over the world. He is going to decide on very important issues on the international policies. Your last administration, in my point of view, was quite unfortunate from the point of view of international relations since they managed to create a real mess in the Middle East.

For more of his views, check out the video:

This young woman, from Mumbai, India, urges American votes to elect someone who is not into “interfering in other countries business.” Here's what she says:

Dr Abdulla Abdulla, from Afghanistan, says the US needs to take a democratic approach towards dealing with global issues, rather than being a lone wolf on the world scene.

And finally, Seung-Min Lee, from South Korea, hopes the US “will be able to help North Korea come out to the world.”

He also says:

I have been paying attention to the US election in the media because any change in the US affects Korean society, directly or indirectly.

Here's his video message:

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  • 3 comments

    1. Sean Says:

      It is rather depressing to think that the majority of Americans pay little to no attention to the affairs of the rest of the world. I often wonder whether they even know that it exists. I know that quite a few Americans will probably feel that the rest of the world pays attention to the US because it is “so important”. Perhaps it is because the rest of the world realizes that with the wrong choice in American leadership, they are often put in uncomfortable if not dangerous positions both politically and socio-economically. Thank God someone is paying attention – I’m afraid few Americans are.

    2. Lordastral Says:

      You are wrong, Sean. There are a great many Americans which pay attention to global affairs, and we realize the position we are in, as a country.

      There are also a great many who do not pay attention. For many, surviving day-to-day, until the next paycheck comes is their reality. For 5 years they bought into the unrelenting laissez-faire plhilosophy of the Republican party, thinking that getting government out of the way would help economic prosperity.

      Whether we pay attention to world events or not, most Americans are focused on repairing our economy, which has been badly mauled by greedy and unethical people, both in business and in government.

      So most likely we will be voting based on the state of the economy, which means that the next President of the United States will most likely be Barack Obama.

    3. Andy Says:

      Sean, I agree with you. It’s very frustrating that international affairs are set aside and while foreign policy seems like a major issue for choosing the right candidate among voters, it’s often overlooked. I too wish more Americans would pay more attention to world affairs, maybe then there would be more understanding and less blind hatred toward other cultures.

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