November 7, 2008

Stories from November 7, 2008

Americas: Learning From the Election

The election of Barack Obama won primarily on a platform of change has inspired some Latin American bloggers from Costa Rica, Cuba and Paraguay to reflect on their own countries They wondered about what they might learn from the historic race, what might be possible, and what is in store for their own countries.

Cameroon: A Discreet Pride

Rather than wax ecstatic on Obama's victory, the collective blog 20mai.net [fr] from Cameroon has chosen to go out in the streets and tape short interviews of young Cameroonians on yesterday's victory. In this video [fr], we learn that Obama is a bantoo name and that Cameroon knows how to keep its African pride and hopes in check, publicly.

Iran: ‘Americans waited for 40 years. How long should we wait?’

Many commentators hope that Barack Obama's inauguration will usher in better relations between the US and Iran. With this in mind, several Iranian bloggers shared their feelings on the outcome of the US presidential election and compared the political situation within both countries.

Kenya Celebrates Obama's Victory

Kenyans stayed awake and celebrated Obama victory. Senator beer got more famous! Others wondered why Kenya spent so much money marketing the country while all they needed was one famous man, and now everybody knows about Kenya.

The Arab World Reacts to Rahm Emanuel's Appointment

It was announced this morning that President-Elect Barack Obama had selected Rahm Emanuel as his Chief of Staff. Emanuel, who served as a top adviser to President Bill Clinton and...

The votes are in: An overwhelming loss for mainstream media

Those of the left, right, center, communist or socialist blocks all agree about one thing: The failure of the mainstream media in its coverage of the road to the White House. Is this merely post-election griping? It can't all be. What issues afflict the mainstream media?

Fourth World Voices: We Can Too

African-American politician Barack Obama’s White House victory is seen as their own triumph by many in the world. But what does the marginalized and invisible world – the Fourth World – think of America’s first multicultural president? Indigenous peoples offer watchful hope for change; many adopt the spirit of “Yes we can.”