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November 30, 2008

Armenian Bloggers Hail Power Return

While most people know Samantha Power as an Obama adviser who has called Hillary Clinton a “monster,” many genocide awareness and prevention activists consider the Harvard professor a hope they can believe in. The Associated Press has noticed that Power, who officially resigned from Obama’s campaign during the Democratic primaries, is on US President-elect Obama’s transition team. This news has encouraged several Armenian bloggers who now feel assured that the author of “A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide” (2002) will remind President-elect Barack Obama to keep his promise of officially recognizing the WWI Armenian Genocide committed by Ottoman Turks.

November 7, 2008

Fourth World Voices: We Can Too

African-American politician Barack Obama’s White House victory is seen as their own triumph by many in the world. But what does the marginalized and invisible world – the Fourth World – think of America’s first multicultural president? Indigenous peoples offer watchful hope for change; many adopt the spirit of “Yes we can.”

November 4, 2008

Russian Bloggers Predict US Vote

Anti-Americanism and racism may be big in Russia, but discussions on US presidential elections mostly reflect worldwide reactions: excitement, fear, hope, and some Obamania. Hours before America votes, many Russian-language bloggers are making predictions about the US race. While most posts are short and, often, sweet, some are still arguing for or against the candidates. Simon Maghakyan brings us the buzz from Russian-speaking blogs.

November 2, 2008

US Elections: The Armenia Effect

With the world anxiously watching the U.S. presidential elections, a tiny country in the former Soviet Union with a small voice may have a strong vote. Excitement about the election among Armenia’s 3-million residents, though, is not showing through local blog posts. But more Armenians live outside their country, and enough of them in the United States to actually make a difference. This could translate a marginal voice to a decisive vote.