November 4, 2008

Stories from November 4, 2008

African Bloggers Offer Solidarity to Obama

As Americans line up to vote-in their 44th President, African bloggers write in solidarity and offer near unanimous support for an Obama Administration. So what are people saying? Ari Herzog brings us the scoop from Africa and around the globe.

Venezuela: Thoughts on Election Day

After the daily speech about the Empire, the elections, and the possibility that the United States could have what some call "their own Chavez," a lot of blogs dedicated some space on the expectation that many parts of the world share today's excitement with the States. Bloggers are expressing online what they feel about both candidates, while some others see Obama as a big possibility for change inside and outside the country. The dark, humorous tone, so characteristically Venezuelan, never ceases to be contained inside the posts...

Dixville Notch Makes Global Blogosphere History

The world was abuzz on the eve of the historic November 4 election when news headlines revealed that Senator Barack Obama had already won by a landslide victory. Non-American bloggers from all corners of the globe got to typing their thoughts away early this morning, way before polling stations even opened in the US, all inspired by an isolated village in New Hampshire. Eunice del Rosario brings us the story.

Why isn't Election Day a Holiday?

As Americans queue up to wait for potentially hours to vote, observers from other countries are wondering why Election Day in the U.S. isn't a holiday. In many countries, voting is mandatory, and the day a holiday to ensure people are able to vote. Although some states do require that businesses give their employees time off to vote, many do not. Jillian C. York looks at reactions from Kenya and Australia.

France : Parties, parties, parties !

If France could vote in the U.S. election, 76 per cent would elect Obama reveals a poll published by sunday paper Le Journal du Dimanche [fr] . At 3pm local time on this crucial Tuesday, for lack of hard news on the outcome of the election, the French blogosphere and Twitter is abuzz with another vital matter: where to spend election night? Where are the best parties in Paris?

The Caribbean Hopes for History to be Made

There is no doubt about it, the 2008 US Presidential election has captured the attention of the world. Whatever the reasons for the unprecedented global interest, there is one common denominator - the rest of the world will continue to be affected by US policies - so in a sense, this is their election as much as it is America's. And in one little corner of the world, at America's back door, Caribbean bloggers have been monitoring developments and waiting for this day...

Who Would Iraq Elect, Obama or McCain?

“Perhaps no other country in the world sees itself as directly affected by Tuesday’s outcome as much as Iraq… If any case could be made that non-Americans should be allowed to vote for either Obama or McCain, then Iraqis would get the first go.” So who would Iraqi bloggers vote for? There is a very wide range of opinions to choose from.

Russian Bloggers Predict US Vote

Anti-Americanism and racism may be big in Russia, but discussions on US presidential elections mostly reflect worldwide reactions: excitement, fear, hope, and some Obamania. Hours before America votes, many Russian-language bloggers are making predictions about the US race. While most posts are short and, often, sweet, some are still arguing for or against the candidates. Simon Maghakyan brings us the buzz from Russian-speaking blogs.

Illegal Alien or Not, the World Reacts to Obama's Auntie Zeituni

Unless you've been living under a rock, you probably know by now that Barack Obama's paternal aunt, Zeituni Onyango, 56, who was affectionately described as "Auntie Zeituni" in his memoir, "Dreams from My Father," is a Kenyan immigrant living in Boston public housing. She is also living there illegally, which complicates issues considering she contributed $260 to her nephew's presidential campaign. Bloggers from around the world react.

Morocco: Only One Day to Go

Morocco may be in the grip of general Obamania, but a few voices here and there still stubbornly resist the flow. Not that the reluctant Moroccans would give their ballot to John McCain if they had the chance, but they are wary of the American model of democracy, of America, and more than a little sick of an election that hides its flaws under a Hollywood-inspired cast and plot.